IJCEMR

Article http://dx.doi.org/10.26855/ijcemr.2021.10.013

The Origins and Social Implications of COVID-19: The Need for a Critical Approach and Discussion from the Society

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Norma González González

Faculty of Political and Social Sciences, Autonomous University of the State of Mexico (UAEMex), Toluca, Mexico State, Mexico.

*Corresponding author: Norma González González

Published: October 29,2021

Abstract

As an essay, this document raises the need to address the issue of the pandemic that currently affects the global world, recovering central approaches for discussion and analysis that have been marginalized in the approach, discussion and knowledge about a health phenomenon that today more than ever, reveals the historical, social, economic and cultural character of health; its profound implications in terms of what is already seen as a watershed in the history of the modern world, and in this sense, those that are presupposed as profound transformations in coexistence and social interactions on a world scale. Hence, the need for an approach that strives to recover a phenomenon that beyond its deployment and medical intervention, requires to be seen from the complexity of its origins and socio-historical and political representations, for the sake of knowledge and decision-making tending to work on the causes that originate it.

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How to cite this paper

The Origins and Social Implications of COVID-19: The Need for a Critical Approach and Discussion from the Society

How to cite this paper: Norma González González. (2021) The Origins and Social Implications of COVID-19: The Need for a Critical Approach and Discussion from the Society. International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medicine Research5(4), 505-513.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.26855/ijcemr.2021.10.013