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International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medicine Research

DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.26855/ijcemr.2022.01.004

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Cytokine Varieties and Cytokine Storms in COVID-19: A Review

A. S. M. Giasuddin1,*, K. A. Jhuma1, R. S. Giasuddin2, W. A. Chowdhury1

1Impulse Hospital, ImHS&RCLtd, 304/E Tejgaon Industrial Area, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh.

2Department of Medicine, Anwer Khan Modern Medical College, Road No. 8A, Dhanmondi, Dhaka-1205, Bangladesh.

*Corresponding author: A. S. M. Giasuddin

Date: November 29,2021 Hits: 2095

Abstract

Cytokines are heterogeneous group of protein cell regulators having many (pleotropic) activities produced by a wide variety of cells in the body. They have made tremendous impact in clinical medicine as well as laboratory medicine. Therapeutic impacts of cytokines have been felt in the areas of cancer, infectious diseases, blood disorders, rheumatic and autoimmune diseases mainly. Quantitative determination of the levels of various cytokines in blood and other body fluids were found to be useful in order to monitor disease activity or monitor treatment or evaluate the need for treatment. The infectious disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) is termed as Corona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). This new virus and the disease were unknown before the outbreak in Wuhan, China in December 2019. Clinical presentations of COVID-19 are a vast spectrum ranging from asymptomatic carriers to critically ill patients with multi organ failure needing multiple life supports. After the virus gains entry into the body through the mucus membrane, massive amounts of cytokines production i.e. cytokine storms occur which play a pivotal role behind COVID-19 pathophysiology in severe and critically ill patients. The cytokines involved are IL-1, IL-2, IL-6, IL-7, IL-8, IL-10, IL-17, IFN-α, IFN-γ, G-CSF, GM-CSF, TNF-α, TNF-β, MCP-1, MIP1A, etc. Potentially dangerous complications may occur which demand that highly trained and well-informed clinicians, nursing staff and laboratory medicine manpower are available where cytokines are to be introduced either as therapy or clinical trial. Some recent aspects of these cytokine varieties and cytokine storms in COVID-19 were discussed in this review article.

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Cytokine Varieties and Cytokine Storms in COVID-19: A Review

How to cite this paper: A. S. M. Giasuddin, K. A. Jhuma, R. S. Giasuddin, W. A. Chowdhury. (2022) Cytokine Varieties and Cytokine Storms in COVID-19: A ReviewInternational Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medicine Research6(1), 16-23.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.26855/ijcemr.2022.01.004