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The Educational Review, USA

DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.26855/er.2022.01.004

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Employing Video Modeling Strategy for Teaching Clothing Skills for Students with Multiple Disabilities

Nabil Sharaf Almalki

Department of Special Education, College of Education, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

*Corresponding author: Nabil Sharaf Almalki

Date: January 26,2022 Hits: 1476

Abstract

This paper seeks to examine the influence of self-development programs as well as training by the use of VM on improving clothing skills in students with multiple disabilities. Forty-four students with multiple disabilities were classified into an experimental group that contained twenty-two learners and a control group that contained twenty-two learners who participated in this study. A pre- and post-tests were adopted in the current study. Training by the use of video modeling was given to the experimental group during five sessions, as well as a self-development program during five sessions. Each session of the training and the self-development program lasted fifty minutes. The findings after the intervention revealed a considerable difference between both groups. Ten items of clothing increased after the intervention, while only four items remained the same. The study concludes that self-development programs and training employing VM might enhance clothing skills among students with multiple disabili-ties.

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Employing Video Modeling Strategy for Teaching Clothing Skills for Students with Multiple Disabilities

How to cite this paper: Nabil Sharaf Almalki. (2022). Employing Video Modeling Strategy for Teaching Clothing Skills for Students with Multiple Disabilities. The Educational Review, USA6(1), 28-36.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.26855/er.2022.01.004